Category Archives: Discussion

Discussion: Pay Per Post “Advertising”

Blogging etiquette is always a hot topic swirling amongst bloggers (and one we’ll discuss in an upcoming BlogTalk Radio segment).  Everyone is looking to turn their online venture into the next cash cow, but would you accept money to write a post on a topic, even if you weren’t interested? 

This is the premise behind such websites as PayPerPost and ReviewMe.  PayPerPost offers products, websites or services to review on a flat fee basis, whereas ReviewMe allows companies to bid on a post appearing on your website.  

Similar to sampling etiquette, the ethical question remains whether or not to disclose the motivation behind your posting.  

Would you take part in pay-per-postings sites? Have you and would you again?

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Discussion: Are Post Templates Right For You?

Most blogs are dynamic, centered around a revolving door of topics, thoughts and ideas.  It’s been suggested that readers appreciate a certain level of consistency, and most bloggers deliver that consistency in the timing or the subject matter of their postings. However, a new theory has emerged relating to consistency within posts.  Would you format posts specifically based on their subject matter and furthermore, would you use a template for those formats?

Daily Blog Tips features a post specifically on this subject, geared towards increasing blogging productivity.  While most of us aren’t looking to cut corners to increase our efficiency, but we are interested in making our posts more digestible for our readers.  

Helpful tips for creating more consistent, digestible content:

  • Use bullet points for easier understanding.
  • Use shorter, more focused paragraphs.
  • Format product reviews similarly, so readers know where to look for essential information, such as price, availability and your final opinion.
  • Similar to writing a newspaper article, place all imperative information at the top of the post.  This is especially imperative for those who use partial RSS feeds.

How do you make your posts easier for your readers to understand? Would you consider using a pre-formatted blogging template?

    Weekly Educational Wrap Up: June 30 – July 4

    Discussion:  Blog Monetization

    One of the biggest challenges we face as bloggers is advertising.  There are three categories of bloggers when it comes to advertising:  those who don’t care and refuse to devote space to advertising on their blogs, those who are curious about advertising, and those who go all out in an effort to fully monetize their blogs.  If you fall into the last two categories, you’ve undoubtedly asked yourself how you can make money from your blog.

    Coutorture BlogTalk Radio Seminar:  What is Twitter?

    Coutorture’s latest BlogTalk Seminar will talk place this Sunday at 6pm EST.  We’ll be discussing “What Is Twitter?” with our co-host Maria Palma, author of The Runway Scoop and Beauty Is Within.

    Discussion: Blog Monetization

    One of the biggest challenges we face as bloggers is advertising.  There are three categories of bloggers when it comes to advertising:  those who don’t care and refuse to devote space to advertising on their blogs, those who are curious about advertising, and those who go all out in an effort to fully monetize their blogs.  If you fall into the last two categories, you’ve undoubtedly asked yourself how you can make money from your blog.

    Blog monetization isn’t an exact science.  It’s entirely dependent upon the type of blogger you are and the type of audience your blog attracts.  There are many monetization options including:

    • Google AdSense
    • Banner ads in your RSS Feed
    • Individually brokered banner ads
    • LinkShare/Link Synergy product links
    • Affiliate banner advertising
    • Reader donations
    • Pay Per Post/Sponsored Posts
    • Ad networks

    One blogger, who shall remain anonymous, makes it a point to support her fellow bloggers by clicking Google AdSense whenever she leaves a blog.  

    What are your methods of monetizing? What methods are your curious about?

    Weekly Educational Wrap Up: June 23 – 27

    • Blogging Strategies: Slow Your Load Time
      • As social media grows, it can be tempting to embed every badge, widget and toolbar into our sidebars in the hopes that it will drive traffic and further promote your blog’s brand.  Aside from an aesthetic standpoint, you can have too many embedded objects in your site leading to a virtual traffic jam.  These objects can delay your site’s load times, frustrate your reader or cause your site to be completely unusable.
    • Discussion: Favorite Blogging Features
      • When we started our first blogs, the majority of us were inexperienced.  We had passion for our chosen topic, but knew little to nothing about the technology and methodology essentialto creating a successful blog.  Web 2.0 has literally exploded, with blogs dedicated to the subject of blogging, tools, and services designed to make the blogging experience a little more interesting.  
    • Essential Blogging: Product Giveaways
      • Network partner Sharon ofThe Bread and Butter posted the following question in our Google Group: I’m curious to know how most of you started putting together your first “Contest” on your blogs. I have no idea what to do and I’m interested in eventually offering “giveaways” and “contests” sometime down the road as well. 
    • Essential Blogging: Brush Up On Blogging Vocabulary
      • These days everyone has a blog, so how do you set yourself apart? One of the greatest parts of “everyone” having a blog is the free flowing transfer of information from one expert to another.  The key to setting yourself apart in the crowded blogosphere is continuous education.  Daily Blog Tips has compiled The Bloggers Glossary, a mini dictionary of terms and definitions essential to any blogger’s vocabulary.  We’ve selected a few essential and surprising terms from the list.

    Discussion: Favorite Blogging Features

    blogging

    When we started our first blogs, the majority of us were inexperienced.  We had passion for our chosen topic, but knew little to nothing about the technology and methodology essentialto creating a successful blog.  Web 2.0 has literally exploded, with blogs dedicated to the subject of blogging, tools, and services designed to make the blogging experience a little more interesting.  

    Tools like ThisNext, Twitter, Del.icio.us, FeedBurner, FriendFeed, Disqus, Polyvore, and Flickr have enhanced our blogging experience to the point that we’ve begun to expect more from our platforms. 

    Depending upon your post types, some platforms are more beneficial than others.  If you’re looking to make the most of your blog, here are some features to consider:

    • Multiple post types (photos, videos, text, roundups, etc)
    • Easily understood interface and dashboard
    • Embeddable media types (some platforms limit these features)
    • Flexible theme types
    • Rich text editor (simplifies HTML)
    • Customizable CSS
    • Multiple blogs under one account
    • Free features vs costly upgrades
    • Domain mapping
    • Multiple pages
    • Strong SEO
    • Future publishing post option
    • Draft auto save
    • Email notification of follow up comments

    With so many platform and hosting options, it can be difficult to understand which is the best option for you.  Please share your favorite features of your current platform and which features you wish you had.  We’re excited to see the results!

    Discussion: Controlling Your Online Presence

    When we first started using the internet, anonymity was key. We struggled to maintain a reasonable distance between our true identities and personal lives, and the life we shared in the online world.  Fast forward to 2008, when the job market has become incredibly competitive thanks to the struggling economy and the internet is leading talented workers to the few jobs available.

    If you’re looking to advance your career, it’s time to start thinking of the way you’re represented online.  After a quick search for your name, you will most likely understand why such steps are necessary.  An arrest, a death or even an unflattering tag in a gossip column could mislead your next potential employer.  As Computer World points out, “someone who has no information online might be perceived as not being as tech-savvy as someone else.”.

    So how do you properly control your online persona? Web Worker Daily has 4 tips: 

    1:  Buy your domain name

    Controlling your .com is one of the most important steps you can take.  Chances are there is someone out there with the same name, so snapping up the url is important.  You don’t need to build a professional site around it, just domain map it to a free blogging platform and include your basic contact information and your current projects.  A little goes a long way.

    2: Understand your Google profile

    As Web Worker Daily points out, most potential employers are going to use Google as a first source. Make sure you appear somewhere within those results, but also know that some of those results aren’t you.

    3: Own your brand

    Make sure you create a LinkedIn, Myspace, Facebook and other social networking sites in your name. Even if your .com doesn’t show in search results, these sites will. Use these sites to showcase your many talents and projects.

    4: Destroy the evidence

    Remove anything incriminating or embarrassing, and be sure to project an image you’re proud of.  The purpose of controlling your own brand is to take control of what is placed online.  You want to be represented in an appropriate and positive manner, not by random bits and pieces aggregated into a search result.

    Do you find it appropriate to control your online persona? Or would you rather remain anonymous in your pursuits? What steps have you already taken to control how other’s perceive you online?